[x]
Welcome to the Stink Eye Discussion Forum!
Join the Discussion! Click Here for Instant Registration.
The Stink Eye Conservative Forum; Politics, News, Republican Election Headquarters
December 13, 2017, 03:25:18 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: France?s Monstrous Char B1 Tank Ate German Panzers for Breakfast  (Read 56 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
apples
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 37852



« on: November 21, 2017, 10:51:10 am »

http://warisboring.com/47857-2/

Quote
At five o?clock in the morning on May 16, 1940 a company of the 8th Panzer Regiment lay in an ambush position along a rubble-strewn street of the French town of Stonne. The day before, the unfortunate village had changed hands several times as French troops attempted to stem the tide of German armor headed toward the English channel, threatening to trap Allied forces in Belgium.

Three squadrons of Stuka dive bombers ravaged Stonne, as well as both French and German artillery. That morning, the Panzer IIIEs and IVDs?then the best tanks in German service?deployed to stave off a French counterattack.

Suddenly, a squat green tank lumbered around a street block directly before of the German unit. This was Eure, a 31.5-ton Char B1 bis tank commanded by Capt. Pierre Billotte. His driver, Sergeant Durupt, triggered the 75-millimeter howitzer fixed in the front hull roared, smashing the Panzer III to the rear of the column. At the same time, Billotte swiveled the smaller 47-millimeter high velocity cannon in the turret and picked off the lead tank?a mere 30 meters away.

Logged
PzLdr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 652



« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2017, 12:32:31 pm »

A great article! As it pointed out, the Allies had more tanks than the Germans [more troops, too]. The only thing the Germans had superiority in numbers were aircraft, and anti-tank guns. But as the article pointed out. most of the German anti-tank guns [the 37mm] were obsolete to obsolescent [against non-tank targets] in the 1940 campaign.

But the Char B, like the Souma suffered from its design. neither was 'speedy', since French doctrine was built around infantry support [French armored divisions were not created until 1940]. As infantry support weapons, they required the tank commander to man the turret gun, as well as commanding the tank. The MAIN gun, the 75mm, was in a Sponson box in the hull [like the Grant tank the U.S produced before the Sherman came in]. That meant that except for very limited traverse and elevation, the entire tank had to be turned toward a target to engage it. What the tank did have was armor. And that played nicely against the German Panzers.

In 1940, German doctrine was to use tanks against infantry, not armor. The role intended for the Mark IV [which at the time carried a short barreled,low velocity 75mm howitzer] and the Sturmgeschutz assault gun, was infantry assault support. The anti-tank role was intended for the anti-tank guns [The Mark III had the same 37mm cannon at the time. Luckily, for the Germans, they had an ace in the hole.

The 88mm FLAK gun had been designed to shoot down planes. But a gun that could put a 37 lb. projectile 30,000 feet in the air to shoot down planes, had the potential to be a devastating anti-tank weapon, if fired horizontally. 88s were first used in the anti-tank role either during the Spanish civil War by Ritter von Thoma, or by Erwin Rommel in France [he was documented using them to stop the British counter-attack at Arras]. In any case, the 88 became the great dual purpose gun of the Wehrmacht [although well past the campaign in France, they were all crewed by Luftwaffe personnel..

Where the Germans were vastly superior to the French [and the Brits, for that matter], was in doctrine, combat experience, and commo. The Germans had wonderful FM sets with throat mikes that allowed conversation between the crew, and with higher HQ  [not a real surprise considering one of the armored branch's founders, Heinz Guderian had been a signals officer in WW I]. And those were what, more than any other thing, allowed the Germans to force Britain off mainland Europe, and force the surrender of Belgium, the Netherlands and France in some six weeks.

A great find, Apples!
Logged

You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
apples
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 37852



« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2017, 12:23:42 pm »

A great article! As it pointed out, the Allies had more tanks than the Germans [more troops, too]. The only thing the Germans had superiority in numbers were aircraft, and anti-tank guns. But as the article pointed out. most of the German anti-tank guns [the 37mm] were obsolete to obsolescent [against non-tank targets] in the 1940 campaign.

But the Char B, like the Souma suffered from its design. neither was 'speedy', since French doctrine was built around infantry support [French armored divisions were not created until 1940]. As infantry support weapons, they required the tank commander to man the turret gun, as well as commanding the tank. The MAIN gun, the 75mm, was in a Sponson box in the hull [like the Grant tank the U.S produced before the Sherman came in]. That meant that except for very limited traverse and elevation, the entire tank had to be turned toward a target to engage it. What the tank did have was armor. And that played nicely against the German Panzers.

In 1940, German doctrine was to use tanks against infantry, not armor. The role intended for the Mark IV [which at the time carried a short barreled,low velocity 75mm howitzer] and the Sturmgeschutz assault gun, was infantry assault support. The anti-tank role was intended for the anti-tank guns [The Mark III had the same 37mm cannon at the time. Luckily, for the Germans, they had an ace in the hole.

The 88mm FLAK gun had been designed to shoot down planes. But a gun that could put a 37 lb. projectile 30,000 feet in the air to shoot down planes, had the potential to be a devastating anti-tank weapon, if fired horizontally. 88s were first used in the anti-tank role either during the Spanish civil War by Ritter von Thoma, or by Erwin Rommel in France [he was documented using them to stop the British counter-attack at Arras]. In any case, the 88 became the great dual purpose gun of the Wehrmacht [although well past the campaign in France, they were all crewed by Luftwaffe personnel..

Where the Germans were vastly superior to the French [and the Brits, for that matter], was in doctrine, combat experience, and commo. The Germans had wonderful FM sets with throat mikes that allowed conversation between the crew, and with higher HQ  [not a real surprise considering one of the armored branch's founders, Heinz Guderian had been a signals officer in WW I]. And those were what, more than any other thing, allowed the Germans to force Britain off mainland Europe, and force the surrender of Belgium, the Netherlands and France in some six weeks.

A great find, Apples!

Thanks PzLdr. Glad you enjoyed it!
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Contact Us by Email
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!