[x]
Welcome to the Stink Eye Discussion Forum!
Join the Discussion! Click Here for Instant Registration.
The Stink Eye Conservative Forum; Politics, News, Republican Election Headquarters
November 24, 2017, 02:36:31 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: FOR APPLES: YOU CAN'T SPELL 'DOUCHEBAG' WITHOUT "CHE"  (Read 85 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
PzLdr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 636



« on: October 14, 2017, 03:04:15 pm »

Fifty years ago, give or take, the world became a better place when the Bolivian Army whacked one Ernesto "Che" Guevera, doctor, Marxist, revolutionary, guerilla, and t-shirt icon.

Guevera, screen icon from "The Motorcycle Diaries, and other celluloid trash, rose toi fame as one of Fidel Castro's loyal lieutenants in the campaign that toppled the Batista regime in Cuba. A 'commandante', who led one of the columns, that marched on Havana from the Sierra Maestra, Che was proclaimed as military genius, a paragon of revolutionary virtue [he and the Castros were keeping their Marxism a secret at the time], and a capable administrator. He was none of those.

Che first showed his true nature to the world [he had already shown it to his fellow guerillas and the Cuban populace in the mountains] as the Commandant of La Cabana prison. It was there that Che had a hole knocked in the outer wall of his office so he could watch the dozens of executions conducted in the name of the revolution in the courtyard below. Abnd there were hundreds of them [In the mountains, Che not only supervised executions, he handled them himself, usually old men and teenagers, all unarmed].

But Che was ready for bigger things. So he was made economics minister and head of the bank. And like any good Marxist, he then set about killing the economy, like he did prisoners, with even greater success and excess.

And so it proceeded apace. A visit to the U.N. and New York. The public embrace of both his Marxism [real], and admiration and love for the Soviet Union [feigned]. And then there was the Cuban Missile Crisis. It appeared that both Castro and Che were in a competition to see who could be more radical. Both declaimed that they wanted the missiles in Cuba fired at the United States. Both seemed to welcome nuclear war between  the Soviets and Americans. Problem was the Soviets didn't. Both complained when the soviets pulled their missiles out of Cuba. But Castro knew from whence his bread came buttered, and buckled under. Guevera didn't. His bitterness was loud and clear to all. And his warm words about the Chinese didn't help.

and then there was the perception problem. The Cuban Revolution could have only one hero. and that hero, according to Fidel, was Fidel. So, with a little urging from the soviets, and an economy in ruins, Castro needed little pressure to send the quixotic Guevera on his way to foster 'World Revolution, because Che saw, from his clippings that he was a genius of guerilla warfare.

So che took his genius, his theories and a bunch of Cubans to Africa, to participate in the war ranging in the Congo. What could be easier? Answer, almost anything.

Guevera despaired of the 'Simbas' he'd partnered with [showing a good deal of racism in the process]. Apparently they hadn't read his tomes. Apparently they weren't in sufficient awe. Obviously, they didn't follow his orders or suggestions. and the European mercs he was pitted against didn't listen, or read either. Because they commenced to whip the simbas on the battlefield. So Che left, accomplishing only one thing of note. He had put the CIA on his trail.

And that trail led to Cuba [briefly], and then on to Bolivia.

Che still believed in world revolution. An the mountainous areas of  Bolivia offered an area like the Four Corners in the U.S. southwest. It provided a common border with two other countries to which Guevera could spread his revolution.

So with a pack of Cubans, Guevera slipped into Bolivia, made contact with the Bolivian communist Party [ mostly for re-supply and re-inforcement], and acclimatized himself to the mountains [Che had asthma]. He also brought a woman, one Tamara Buncke, ostensibly from East Germany as a liaison  [but possibly as a minder]. And then the wheels started to fall off. First, Guevera refused to cooperate with the Bolivian communists. He merely tried ordering them around. Result? Recruits and supplies dried up. then the U.S notified the Bolvian government that they suspected Guevera was in-country. Then the two countries agreed to have a Green Beret team train a battalion of Bolivian Rangers to track the guerillas and destroy them

Against this background, Che found that the Bolivian peasants weren't receptive to his message. The government had already undertaken land, and other reforms. So while it wasn't paradise, their wasn't much enthusiasm for Bolivian, let alone world, revolution in them their hills. And when persuasion failed, coercion followed, with food seizures, and impressment of 'volunteers' for the 'struggle'. One result was that the peasants began flipping the guerillas in, with the result that the Bolivian Rangers got on their trail and hounded them relentlessly.

And the Guerilla 'genius'? He split his force into two columns, and they promptly lost sight of each other. And despite wandering around within a mile of each other, they never made contact again.  And then the Bolivians captured Regis Dubrais, a Che wannabe, and another Marxist. Their debrief led to an ambush near a river. and when the smoke cleared, Tamara Bunke was dead, and Guevera was down to one column.

He headed up into the mountains, but now, the peasants' hands [and mouths] were turned against him. The intel they furnished was solid and timely. Guevera, the high priest of world revolution, the leading intellectual of guerilla warfare, walked into an ambush.

The Bolivian Rangers smashed up Guevera's column. and after they wounded the great man himself, Guevera put up his hands, yelling, "Don't shoot. I'm Che. I'm worth more to you alive". As with so many other things, he was wrong.  the next day, despite protests from CIA and Green Beret personnel on the scene, and in La Paz, Guevera was executed by a Bolivian solider. Karma's a bitch. Ten with his hands cut off for ID, he was buried in a secret grave [he was turned over to the Cubans later]

Safely dead, Castro could celebrate Guevera as a martyr of the Revolution, and bury him in Cuba. Guevera then went on to his second life as a t-shirt for semi-literate Americans, and an inspiration to insipid coffee houseRevolutionaries.

But what he, really. He was a brutal psychopath even his friends and allies came to fear. He was a failed guerilla chief. Cpt. Kangaroo could have beaten Batista. Che failed in the congo. He failed spectacularly in Bolivia.

Che was not the best of Castro's field commanders. But he was one of, if not the most, murderous of the lot, and the most fanatical. He deserves neither the mythology, the worship, nor the accolades. He was a thug who got what he deserved. death in the mountains.
Logged

You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
apples
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 37826



« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2017, 05:35:24 pm »

Thank you....love it t-shirt icon. Is it true he came from a wealthy family? Something to do with yachts?
Logged
PzLdr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 636



« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2017, 06:56:38 pm »

Thank you....love it t-shirt icon. Is it true he came from a wealthy family? Something to do with yachts?

His family was [at least] comfortably middle class. They had five or six kids [including Che], and in Argentina, that took some coin. but I don't know how they earned their living.
Logged

You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
apples
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 37826



« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2017, 02:31:26 pm »

His family was [at least] comfortably middle class. They had five or six kids [including Che], and in Argentina, that took some coin. but I don't know how they earned their living.

Thanks. Will see if I can find the source of where I got that info.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Contact Us by Email
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!