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Author Topic: PzLdr History Facts  (Read 29727 times)
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PzLdr
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« Reply #465 on: May 05, 2018, 09:20:49 am »

U.S Grant wanted to bring the confederate Army of Northern Virginia to bay. Robert E. Lee wanted to inflict major damage on the Army of the Potomac and halt yet another Northern attack toward Richmond. They met in the wilderness, the same area where, the year before, Lee had smashed Joseph Hooker at the Battle of Chancellorsville. And as at that former battle; despite excellent defensive ground, Lee attacked.

It was one of the most confusing battles of the Civil War. Sparks from black powder ignition literally caused fires that burned wounded from both sides to death. Union troops were disconcerted to find the skeletons of those killed at Chancellorsville on the surface of the ground, caused by heavy rains that had lifted the bodies out of shallow graves. Actions were fought more by brigade than division or Corps.

The fighting continued for some three days, after which Grant, having lost surprise withdrew, and began the process of flanking  Lee and moving south that got him to Petersburg [his troops actually cheered when he ordered them south, instead of to withdraw].

And Lee? He stopped Grant. But it cost him [for a time] James Longstreet, his First Corp commander, severely wounded in the throat by friendly fire, in an incident eerily reminiscent of Stonewall Jackson's. And it cost him troops he could no longer replace. Lee's instinct to attack once again led to a loss of a higher percentage of his army than his enemy's. The result? Lee was unable, from the Wilderness on, to take the operational or strategic offensive role  against the North. Except for some tactical endeavors, such as the attack on Fort Stedman, Robert E. Lee would spend the rest of the civil War strictly on the defensive.
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« Reply #466 on: May 06, 2018, 11:13:51 am »

She was the largest of the rigid framed lighter than airships built in Nazi Germany between the wars for commercial use [cargo and passenger transportation] on an international scale. Named HINDENBURG, after the legendary General and late Reichs President, the airship carried passengers from Germany as far as the United States in comfort.

A Zeppelin, so named for the designer of airships from before WW I [Erwin Rommel wanted to work on Zeppelins as a youth], HINDENBURG followed the German approach to lighter than airships, with metal internal framing, and large bags/containers of hydrogen for left. Powered by several powerful aircraft engines, she was capable of good speed with good fuel economy, and capable of carrying large amounts of cargo, or enough passengers to be profitable. Her weakness, however, was the use of hydrogen.

Hydrogen, while perfectly suited from the lift point of view, was exceptionally dangerous from the safety point of view. Unlike Helium, hydrogen was capable of intense fire,and violent explosion if ignited. And the Germans recognized the problem. So Adolf Hitler sought to buy helium from the United States. And Franklin Roosevelt refused to sell him any.

On May 6, 1937, after an uneventful crossing of the Atlantic, HINDENBURG approached her docking tower at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in New Jersey. The weather was not good, with winds causing problems for the ship and ground crew who were attempting to tether the airship. There appeared to be a storm coming, and the air was charged with static electricity. Suddenly, starting at the top of the Zeppelin's body, near the stern, HINDENBURG burst into flames. the fire raced forward, consuming the upper structure, with the airship falling to the ground [some 200 feet plus] in seconds. Of a complement of just under 100 passengers and crew, 13 passengers and 21 crewmen died [as did one of the ground crew]. It was over in minutes.

A court of inquiry fixed the blame on a probable gas leak and a spark as the cause of the conflagration. Hitler said nothing about the denial of helium to Germany by the U.S. government.

Lighter than aircraft were used during WW II. they included soft bodied "barrage balloons", tethered to the ground, and in the case of the U.S., naval dirigibles on long range anti-submarine, and reconnaissance patrols.But the age of the rigid dirigible type aircraft was, for the time being over. There are some articles I have read that seem to be pointing for the resurrection of large, rigid framed lighter than aircraft for international freight carrying, and perhaps, people. hopefully, they'll use helium.
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« Reply #467 on: May 07, 2018, 01:05:20 am »

1763: PONTIAC'S REBELLION
          See "PzLdr History Facts" Archive, p.13

1915: THE SINKING OF THE LUISITANIA
           See "PzLdr History Facts" Archive, p.13

1945: NAZI GERMANY SURRENDERS
           See "PzLdr History Facts" Archive, p.1   
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« Reply #468 on: May 07, 2018, 11:58:38 am »

1957: The Death of Senator Joseph McCarthy

He has been maligned, vilified, and his name is now shorthand for political extremism against free speech, and unfounded attacks without proof, 'smearing' their target.  But McCarthy, the junior Senator from Wisconsin, energized the political right against the influence of, and spying by, Communists and their fellow travelers in the U.S. government, and, indirectly, on such institutions as Hollywood [McCarthy concentrated on the government]. His Waterloo was the Army Hearings he led, where Dwight Eisenhower used them to cut him off at the knees. McCarthy wound up censured by the Senate, with no ability to write legislation, co-sign legislation, or hold any committee appointments.

McCarthy was, however, correct about the Communists having infested the government. Eisenhower's destruction of him put that truth  beyond the pale, and like the "Swiftboaters", what he he said, and did, was stood on its head by generations of detractors. McCarthy is buried in his home state of Wisconsin, a man, who to this day, is unfairly maligned.

2011: Bye, Bye Bin Laden

On this date in 2011, a piece of offal was swept from the world at large, as Osama Bin Laden met a SEAL that neither barked, balanced balls on its nose, nor ate fish. He just killed him.

The mastermind of the 9/11 tragedy was found hiding in Pakistan, right down the road from a Pakistani military school, and in a nightie raid, his account was marked 'paid'.

But then for reasons I cannot comprehend [except by the explanation Barack Obama was the Commander in chief], his body was neither bathed in pig blood, nor fed to dogs, but was rather, given a Muslim funeral on an American aircraft carrier, as if he were a regular enemy combatant, instead of the murderous piece of sh*t he was.

That always got me...why give him a muzzie burial?  Obama of course. Of course the left did what they always do to a enemy...destroy them. They destroyed McCarthy and still do.
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« Reply #469 on: May 09, 2018, 10:42:42 pm »

See "PzLdr History Facts"  Archive, p.1: 'The Sichelsschnitt'


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« Reply #470 on: May 09, 2018, 10:53:01 pm »

He had been severely wounded at the moment of his greatest triumph - the surprise attack on the Union right flank at the Battle of Chancellorsville. Returning from a night reconnaissance while trying to determine the position of fleeing Union forces, LTG Thomas 'Stonewall' Jackson was fired on by his own troops and hit some three times. Evacuated from the battlefield, Jackson suffered the amputation of one of his arms as a result of damage from his wounding. Taken to the rear, he developed pneumonia. and since pneumonia was such a fairly common cause of death, his attending physician was able to predict [accurately] that Jackson would die on a Sunday, a fact that pleased the deeply religious Jackson.

Jackson did, indeed die on a Sunday, with his wife present. his last words were, "Let us cross over the river, and rest in the shade of the trees"

Stonewall Jackson is buried in two locations. His body rests at VMI, where he taught before the civil War. His arm was buried with full honors near the site of his wounding.
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« Reply #471 on: May 10, 2018, 09:41:20 pm »

Didn't realize the HIndenburg was in USA when this happened. Didn't realize it could carry that many passengers.
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« Reply #472 on: May 11, 2018, 12:43:41 am »

See "PzLdr History Facts" Archive, p.2 - Yellow Tavern
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« Reply #473 on: May 11, 2018, 11:20:53 am »

He betrayed his country. As an Englishman, he betrayed his class. He betrayed his country's greatest ally, the United states. He sent hundreds of men to their deaths. and he died on this day, in Moscow, in 1988.

Harold Russell Adrian Philby was a child of privilege. His father, St. john Philby was a British archtype, the 'eccentric' Englishman. A member of the civil Service, he had converted to Islam, and was an Orientalist of note. His son, nicknamed 'Kim', for the Kipling character, seemed to follow the pattern for a young man of his class. he went to his father's public school, and then to Cambridge University. But, as Dylan would have said, "The Times they Are A 'Changin'".

The Cambridge Philby attended was rife with far left political groups - and rich pickings for soviet Intelligence.

By the time he graduated, Philby was a committed Communist. He traveled to Austria to help the Marxists fight the Dolfuss government. He married his first wife, a Communist, to get her out of Austria, and into England. and by the mid-thirties, Philby was working for the then NKVD.

Philby was one of the so-called "Cambridge Five", a constellation of Soviet 'sleeper' agents, all from Cambridge, most from the upper class [John Cairncross was the exception] who were recruited in college. their brief was simple. discard their outward Marxism, internalize it, blend in, and infiltrate the various pillars of British society that would furnish the most help to the U.S.S.R. So Donald Maclean, a classmate of Philby's, joined the Foreign Service. Guy Burgess joined the BBC. Anthony Blunt stayed at Cambridge as a talent spotter and recruiter, and then moved into British intelligence. John Cairncross wound up working on Enigma.

Philby, after a stint as a reporter, was recruited to MI6, the intelligence service, working his way steadily upward and inward. By the end of World War II, Philby led Section 9, and was bandied about as the eventual head of the service. He was then posted as liaison with the CIA, and FBI to the United States.

It was while there, that the train went off the rails. Philby became aware  that a Soviet spy in the British embassy had been 'made' in a general sense. that spy, codenamed 'Homer' had traveled from D.C. to N.Y.C. at least twice a month to see his handler, and his wife. 'Homer' was Donald Maclean.  To warn him that MI5 [British counter intelligernce] was closing in on him, Philby used Burgess, now with the Embassy, and living with Philby to warn Maclean, by getting Burgess sent back to England in disgrace.

But Burgess fled with Maclean, instead of just seeing him safely on his way. And coupled with other events in the recent past, suspicion fell on Philby.

While he was absolved by no less than Harold McMillan, Philby's rise in MI6 was over. He was let go.

The early '60s found Philby working as a reporter [and possible MI6 stringer] in Beirut. But the past reared its ugly head. A woman who Philby had tried to recruit before WW II for the Soviets finally blew the whistle on him, as did several others. MI6 sent the regional spy chief to interrogate Philby, who, surprisingly, confessed. But Philby asked for a week to consider signing a written confession. By the time the week was up, Philby was gone. Off to the Soviet Union, where, among other things, he seduced Maclean's wife, and worked as a consultant for the KGB.

Kim Philby died in Moscow in 1988. The only pity in that is that he didn't live long enough to see the fall of the Soviet Union. Philby was a miserable, egotistical, lying weasel, who betrayed his country, his friends, and hundreds of men he sent to their deaths. Good riddance to bad rubbish.
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« Reply #474 on: May 14, 2018, 01:24:29 pm »

Wow.....His arm burried different place. Didn't know any of this. Once again thank you so much for this history lesson PzLdr!!!
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« Reply #475 on: May 17, 2018, 08:29:12 am »

His Apache name was Goyalthe (p/s) ["He Who Yawns"]. He was a Bedonkohe Chiricahua Apache. He earned the sobriquet Geronimo while fighting Mexicans from the town whose troops killed his wife and children. He was brother-in-law to Juh, chief of the Nedni Apache of northern Mexico. He fought with, and for Cochise and Mangas Coloradus. And by the mid 1870s, he had earned both a fearsome reputation, and a great deal of influence over Cochise's ultimate successor, his younger son Naiche.

As with many Apaches, Geronimo was sent to the San Carlos Indian reservation [concentrating large numbers of Indians made for good 'stats' for the Indian agents, in this case John Clum]. Bu San Carlos had originally been designated for the northern apaches, the Tontos, the White Mountains, the Arivipas, none of whom were friends of the Chiricahuas, and many of whom were sworn enemies. Plus, being first on the scene, the Northern bands had taken all the good land. The remnant left was a hell hole.

The Americans knew the potential for trouble. Victorio's war would have been avoided completely if his band, the Warm Springs Apaches had been allowed to settle on a reservation at Ojo Caliente. But that wouldn't have helped clum's stats, so after being sent back to San Carlos some two or three times, Victorio chose war.

Life on the reservation required activities the Apache warriors loathed, like farming, and proscribed conduct they found perfectly natural, like getting drunk and beating their wives. And by 1885 Geronimo, who had already jumped the reservation at least twice fled again. There were several causes. Geronimo and several others got drunk as lords on tiswin, a corn beer the Apaches brewed, a beverage they were forbidden to make. Then there was a confrontation over a holy man, that wound up with him dead, along with several cavalry troopers, and with several apache scouts involved in the soldiers' deaths.  Geronimo fled with about 50 warriors and a bit less than 100 women and children. He headed south for Mexico, the Sierra Madre mountains. Among those with him were Naiche, Chihuahua, Nana [now almost 90], and Mangas [son of Mangas Coloradus].

George Crook immediately put two columns in the field, composed of cavalry and large  numbers of Chiricahua Apache Scouts [which gives some idea of how many Apache felt about Geronimo]. Eventually, Crook ran down the Apache in Mexico, and after some dickering, the Chiricahuas surrendered. But then crook blundered. He rode ahead of the Apache band to wire Sheridan about their surrender. Geronimo and Naiche got drunk, and then fled again [Chihuahua, and Nana came in. Mangas stayed out].

Geronimo's escape cost Crook his job. He was replaced by Nelson Miles, and in September, 1886, Geronimo finally came in and surrendered at Skeleton Canyon. He was promptly shipped, along with his band, to Florida, as were ALL the Chiricahua Apaches, including those who remained loyal to the United states, and the Apache Scouts who had hunted them down.

Geronimo lived until 1909, when drunk, he fell off his horse into a puddle, passed out, and caught pneumonia. He is buried where his captivity ended, Ft. Sill, Oklahoma [where the resident tribe, the Apache's hereditary enemies, the Comanche, made them welcome]. Geronimo died a living legend. He marched in Theodore Roosevelt's inauguration parade  [along with Comanche Quanah Parker, and Lakota Rain In The Face]. He learned to print his name, and sold his autograph and Apache items he made himself.

But he is still remembered as the symbol of Apache resistance, and the last hostile apache to surrender, ending America's longest war.
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« Reply #476 on: May 17, 2018, 02:55:17 pm »

Thank you PzLdr another one I knew nothing about!
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« Reply #477 on: May 18, 2018, 07:59:31 pm »

On this date, in 1940, a battalion of the 2nd Panzer Division, part of Heinz Guderian's XIXth Panzer Corps, reaches the English channel just past Abbeville, France. With that fact the British Expeditionary Force [BEF], and the better part of the French Army are cut off from France by an encirclement that began on the night of May 12th, when Erwin Rommel's 7th Panzer Division, part of Hermann Hoth's XVth Panzer Corps, crossed the Meuse river near Dinant. Guderian stormed accross the Meuse against French General Corap's 9th Army the next day.

The encirclement, part of Erich Von Manstein's SICHELLSCHNITT Plan [see "PzLdr History Facts" Archive, page 1] resulted when the BEF and French forces moved to the Dyle River in Belgium [touching a corner of the Netherlands] in response to a feint intended to do just that caused by the invasion of those two countries by Fedor Von Bock's Army Group 'B'. The Germans will take all the channel ports but one [Dunkirk] over the next four days [having been halted for 24 hours on Hitler's orders, after the battle of Arras].

By June 5th, over 300,00o British and French troops will have escaped to England. But by June 6th, Rommel again leading, the German Army will launch phase 2 of the French campaign, against a now numerically inferior Allied force. In less than 3 weeks, France will surrender, and Great Britain will have been driven off the European continent.
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« Reply #478 on: May 20, 2018, 12:11:26 am »

1498: VASCO DA GAMA REACHES INDIA:

He was the final piece in a chain of exploration and conquest that had started on the northwestern littoral of North Africa, and had worked its way south along the African coast, and then, via the Cape of Good hope east and then northeast up Africa's east coast. and in 1498, Vasco Da Gama became the Portuguese explorer who achieved the goal. He reached India by sailing across the Indian Ocean, arriving at the port of Malindi.

The work had been begun by Prince Henry the Navigator, and his Navigation School at Sagres. The Portuguese invented the Caraval, the first western ship that could sail "against the wind", and began a series of forts/ trading posts that worked their way down and around the Africanc Coast in an effort to reach the treasures of the Far East, particularly silk and spices [a sea route being necessary with the disintegration of the Mongol empire, and its control of the entire spice road].

Da Gama's arrival in Malindi did not sit well with established Muslim merchants [the Portuguese had been at wear with them in Africa, Madagascar and Zanzibar, and had usurped a great deal of their trade], and on a second voyage, Da Gama killed a number of them for their prior killings of Portuguese sailors.

But Da Gama led the way to Asia's riches. Further Portuguese voyages led to China [the Portuguese still call tea "Cha", pronounced "Sha"], the Spice Islands [and as a result of a storm off the western coast of Africa], Brazil.

Vasco Da Gama, rightly described as one of Portugal's great heroes and sailors, is buried in Lisbon.

1506: COLUMBUS DIES IN SPAIN:

He had conducted four voyages to the New World for the Spanish Crown [Portugal having declined to finance him] by sailing west. He discovered the Caribbean  islands, and Hispanolia [the current Dominican Republic and Haiti]. He established Spain's claims to an empire that eventually included Mexico, Central and South America, the Aztec and Inca Empires, and the entire southwest and California.

But after his third voyage, an investigation into the governance of he and his brothers resulted in his being returned to Spain in chains. He undertook one further voyage, but on his return to Spain, although he was quite wealthy already, his repeated petitions for an audience with the King over monies he felt he was owed were denied. He died, aggrieved, at least in his own mind, in Spain on this date in 1506. still the "Admiral of the Ocean Sea", he is buried in Spain.
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« Reply #479 on: May 21, 2018, 10:24:52 pm »

Wow He marched in Theodore Roosevelt's inauguration parade and sold his autograph....very interesting. Thank you PzLdr!
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