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Author Topic: PzLdr History Facts  (Read 11128 times)
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apples
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« Reply #210 on: June 15, 2017, 04:56:38 am »

http://www.oradour.info/

http://www.oradour.info/ruined/ruined.htm

was curious...found these. Thank you for posting.
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« Reply #211 on: June 15, 2017, 05:07:57 am »

I miss him too. I remember my stepfather used to watch his old movies. Black and white movies in the early mornings when he couldn't sleep. Hellfighters one of my fav John Wayne movies. Heck most of them are my favs!

Once Johnny Carson had a trash truck driver on. He used to be the trash pickup for John Wayne. He said he found a script and on it it asked the time for Wayne to show up on the set. The trash truck driver said the time was at your convenience Mr Wayne.
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« Reply #212 on: June 17, 2017, 08:58:43 am »

1775: The Battle of Bunker Hill [actually Breed's Hill]:

After their catastrophic hammering on the road back from Lexington and concord, the British regroup at Boston, and the Patriot militias converge on the city, cutting it off by land, and moving forward to occupy [and fortify] a position on bunker hill. however, they occupy the wrong hill. Breed's Hill, smaller, and forward of bunker hill is where they wind up. They hastily dig entrenchments [to the admiration and amazement of the British generals], and prepare for battle.

The British have almost all the generals at Boston that will conduct the Revolutionary War from the British side. there's Thomas Gage, Henry Clinton, William Howe, and Johnny Burgoyne. Howe will lead the attack they decide upon.

The British launch an amphibious attack, landing to the southeast of the Rebels, forming up, and advancing on the fortifications. To their shock and chagrin, they meet a hail of fire ["Don't fire 'til you see the whites of their eyes"] that not only stops them cold, and drives them back, but takes out an inordinate amount of officers [an American practice that will bedevil the British for the entire war].

The Redcoats re-form   and advance again, with the same result. The Patriots, however, are, by now increasingly low on ammunition, and have made futile efforts at re-supply. The British now storm the colonists' redoubts at the point of the bayonet, the British weapon that will terrorize the Americans for much of the war. Those colonists not killed flee. among the dead is Dr. Joseph Warren, one of Massachusetts' leading rebels. But British losses are much heavier, and the British soon abandon their plans to break the land blockade. Within a short time, the American Army will have a commander, George Washington. Shortly after that, the Americans will do another overnight fortification job, this time on the Dorchester Heights, where they will emplace captured artillery from Fort Ticonderoga, brought cross country by Henry Knox. Since the guns command Boston Harbor, and since the lad approach to Boston is still in Rebel hands, the British are forced to abandon, and evacuate Boston. The war is well and truly on.

1876: THE BATTLE OF THE ROSEBUD

It occurred eight days before the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and that debacle did much to distract both the citizenry and the Army from George Crook's worst moment, the Battle of the Rosebud.

In the Spring of 1876, the U.S. Army was ordered to bring in all the non-reservation Lakota and Cheyenne still on the Northern Plains. The plan called for three converging columns, commanded by Alfred Terry [from the East], John Gibbon [from the West], and George Crokk [from the South]. There were several problems with the plan. First, they didn't know where, in the exceedingly large area of operations, the Indians were. Second, communication between the columns would be problematic, relying on couriers largely "flying blind". and third, there was a dearth of fighting experience against Indians in the command structure. Gibbons had little, Terry had none. the only two officers on the expedition with any significant experience fighting Indians were George Armstrong Custer [a subordinate of Terry, and George Crook.

George Crook probably had more experience fighting Indians than most of the Army officer corps combined. He had fought Indians in the northwest. He had made his bones fighting the Apache and Yavapi in the southwest [the Apache called him "Nantan Lupan"-the Grey Fox]. So he seemed the ideal commander for the expedition. turns out he wasn't.

On 17 JUNE, Crook was marching north when he halted the column for rest and consolidation. His men unsaddled their horse and made breakfast, sdespite warnings from Shoshone and Crow scouts that a large number of Sioux and Cheyenne were nearby. Crook either disbelieved the reports, or believed the Indians would not attack. In either case, he was wrong.

Soon, Crow and Shoshone scouts rode in from the north, yelling that the Sioux were coming. And they were, over a thousand Sioux and Cheyenne, under the command of Crazy Horse. They caught Crook and his men flatfooted. And to make it worse, Crazy Horse had imposed some lind of discipline on his horsemen. they didn't fight in massed formations, like the Army, but neither did they attack in a disorganized mass.

Crazy Horse seemed to have an absolute victory in his hands. Except for the scouts. the Shoshone and Crow had set up in defense forward of the U.S troopers picnic breakfast. They blunted the Sioux-Cheyenne attack, and then countercharged, buying enough time for the soldiers to react and organize a defense.

the battle raged for several hours before the Indians withdrew. Crook had suffered fairly serious losses. But it was what he did next that was inexplicable. Retreating back to his supply point, Crook failed to notify ANYBODY of his defeat, or the size and location of the Indians he had fought. In fact, in the immediate aftermath of the battle, he told no one anything. So, neither Gibbon nor Terry was aware that there was no longer a southern column working its way north. And Custer was unaware that Crook had been engaged by a force of Indians at least twice the size of the whole Seventh Cavalry [ it was actually much larger than even that], nor where they were.

Crook eventually returned to fighting the Apache in Arizona and New Mexico, but fell afoul of Phil Sheridan, botched the capture of Geronimo [he did most of the work, Nelson Miles would get the credit], and was relieved at his own request. Bu his nadir occurred on the Northern Plains, at the Rosebud.

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« Reply #213 on: June 19, 2017, 09:44:57 am »

1864:

Off the French port of Cherbourg, the U.S.S KEARSARGE engages the notorious Confederate raider C.S.S ALABANMA in a battle that results in the sinking of the Confederate ship. ALABAMA, one of the Confederacy's best known warships [along with the raiders FLORIDA and SHENANDOAH], had been built in Great Britain [Liverpool], and armed off the coast of Ireland. commanded by Captain Raphael Semmes, she had gone on to terrorize Union merchant shipping to the point where a severe disruption of merchant shipping was likely.

ALABAMA had been in Cherbourg for repairs and re-supply after months at sea. KEARSARGE, having caught Semmes with his pants down, as it were, waited for ALABAMA to emerge and join combat. Semmes took up the challenge. KEARSARGE was able to triumph, according to Semmes, because she hung chains down the side of her hull to deflect, or minimize the effect of ALABAMA's shot. Semmes escaped capture when he was rescued from the water by a British yacht that had arrived to watch the battle. At the end of the war, he commanded, as an Admiral, naval infantry in the retreat from Richmond.

Great Britain, on the other hand, was forced to pay a VERY large claim against it by the United States, for the damage caused by the Confederate raiders, all of which had been built by the British. The British government had also, under U.S. pressure, during the war finally stopped the building of warships for the Confederacy, when the halted the construction of two "Rams" for Jefferson Davis.


1944:

Its official name is the Battle of the Philippines Sea, but it has come down to us by the more commonly known sobriquet of "The Great Marianas Turkey Shoot", because it spelled the effective end of Japanese Naval air power in the Pacific.

By 1944, the Japanese were still searching for the 'decisive battle' they held so dear. Coupled with the necessity to defend the Marianas, the "outer ring" of their defensive perimeter, they decided to combine their carrier air power with island based aircraft to fight the Americans. the Americans, with a staggering preponderance in men, material and experience were more thasn ready to engage. but the American commander, Raymond Spruance fought a defenasive air battle, in the sense that, using his radar and picket ships, he let the Japanese come to him. And they did. In waves. and the Americans shot them down. in waves.

By the time the battle was over, the Japanese had lost close to 500 aircraft, over 300 from their carriers. to add insult to injury, two of their fleet carriers, the brand new TAIHO, and SHOKAKU of Pearl Harbor and Coral Sea fame, were sunk. By U.S. submarines.

And while Spruance received some criticism [undeserved] for a perceived lack of aggressiveness, Japan's naval air power back was broken. When the Japanese made their last effort of the war, the Battle of Leyte Gulf, the action was carried out by what remained of their surface fleet. What carriers Japan still possessed were used as a sacrificial bait to draw Halsey awat from the battle area.
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You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
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« Reply #214 on: June 19, 2017, 09:59:38 am »

On this date, in 1953, after a lifelong commitment to communism, at least a decade of spying for the Soviet Union, and acting as a transit station for nuclear secrets from the Manhattan Project, which allowed the U.S.S.R to build an atomic bomb some four to five years ahead of schedule, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg are executed in the electric chair at Sing Sing.

The Rosenbergs, who had been involved in two spy rings Julius, codenamed 'Liberal' and 'Engineer' by his NKVD handlers, had been engaged in industrial espionage while working for the U.S. Army Signal Corps from the mid 130s on. When his brother-in-law, David Greenglass, was stationed at Los Alamos, in the machine shop, Ethel importuned him to help the cause, and had him furnish diagrams and designs of items he was fabricating, which the Rosenbergs forwarded to the Soviets.

The Rosenbergs, along with such luminaries as Donald Maclean [of the Cambridge Five], were exposed by the Venona transcripts, which were not used at their trial. And although promised mercy if the 'rolled' on their comrades and handlers, Julius and Ethel preferred death for the 'cause'. They got their wish. 
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« Reply #215 on: June 20, 2017, 09:36:39 am »

He had come up in the world of crime partnered with Meyer Lansky. Lansky was the brains, Siegel was the muscle. He wasn't stupid, but he wasn't Lansky. Still, the "Bug and Meyer" gang was a success in Prohibition, and became even more successful as a result of reuniting with a friend from their teen years on the lower East Side, Charles "Lucky" Luciano.

Luciano, a Sicilian who believed in making money with anyone, Sicilian or not, and Lansky were incredibly tight. And Benjamin Siegel was right there with them. Siegel, who preferred "Benny" to "Bugsy" [a sobriquet that meant 'Crazy'] was a handy addition to Luciano's ability to strike at his enemies within Italian organized crime, since he wasn't known to them. Siegel was, most likely, one of the men who murdered Salvatore Marranzano, giving Luciano control of the Italian mob. He may have ben in on the killing of Joe "The Boss" Masseria before that. Whether he was or not, Siegel had a well deserved reputation as a stone cold killer.

But as crime got organized, and flourished, Siegel rose through the ranks of 'management' due to his close association with Lansky and Luciano, to the point where the Commission sent him to take over, and run, the criminal operations on the West Coast. It was while traveling to his new assignment that Siegel discovered Las Vegas, home of legalized gambling [Lansky's true love], and propsed that the mob, working through straw men, build a casino to both pull in, and launder, cash.

It was a great idea, but it was the beginning of the end for Siegel. Siegel, neither an architect, nor engineer, kept tearing down and rebuilding the "Flamingo", to the point where the cost overruns were in the millions. On top of that, there was strong evidence that Siegel and his girl friend, Virginia Hill, were skimming from the funds, and later, the take. then there was the West Coast Racing wire service. The mob stood to make a great deal of money on west coast horserace bets, if they knew who won what in real time, via the wire. Siegel refused to share. Bad mistake.

Normally, the killing of a mobster of Bugsy Siegel's stature was a major event. And it required the highest authority to authorize it. So, after his deportation to Italy, Charlie Luciano showed up in Cuba, to check on his casino investments with Lansky, and to chair a commission meet on Siegel [It was during this Cuban interlude that Frank Sinatra showed up with a suitcase with 300 large for Lucky from the States]. Whether he sought to save his longtime friend, or how much Lansky may have argued on his behalf is unknown. What is known is that with Luciano leading, the vote was to kill Bugsy Siegel.

The hit occurred at Virginia Hill's house in Beverly Hills. Siegel was shot through a window with a rifle while speaking to an associate [Miss hill was not at home]. The crime was never solved.

Siegel has lived on through crime movies and TV documentaries. And the very day he died, Lucky Luciano's men took over the flamingo.
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You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
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