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Author Topic: PzLdr History Facts  (Read 33287 times)
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apples
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« Reply #450 on: April 23, 2018, 03:47:13 pm »

Love to read your history.
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« Reply #451 on: April 23, 2018, 03:48:33 pm »

submarines  in 1914??? What kind?

They looked a lot like the U-boats of WW II, though obviously not as technologically advanced. And they didn't have the range of the Kriegsmarine's Type VIIs and IXs. The U -boat that sunk the LUISITANIA off Ireland was about as far out as they could operate, i.e, the immediate vicinity of the British Isles. Tthink the Type I and II U-boats of WW II. They had torpedo tubes, and deck guns.
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« Reply #452 on: April 23, 2018, 03:55:20 pm »

Thank you for this one!!!! They did a special on Cnn a few days ago about this subject. I realy thank you for this one.   Wink
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« Reply #453 on: April 23, 2018, 04:03:55 pm »

 We had a pool during one quake could hear it swish right before our house shook. Cali gave us Boxer, Feinstien  Arnold....the list is long.
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« Reply #454 on: April 24, 2018, 11:43:35 am »

Kriegsmarine Grand Admiral Erich Raeder is born on this date in 1876. Raeder, who will lead the German Navy prior to, and during, the first half of world War II  will be replaced by his rival, and commander of the U-boat fleet, Karl Doenitz as the result of an unsuccessful convoy attack in norwegian waters.

Raeder tried, with some success, to get German strategic materials earmarked for the Kriegsmarine before the war. He also developed an ambitious building program, "PLAN 'Z'" for the Navy, with the aim of making it a powerful enough force to challenge the Royal Navy in European waters by 1947 [Hitler having promised him that war would not come before then]. That plan included some 10 battleships [with BISMARCK and TIRPITZ being the SMALLEST], three aircraft carriers, plus a fleet of heavy cruisers, destroyers and other various surface ships, and a fleet of U-boats.

But Raeder labored under several handicaps. First, Hitler lied to him. When war started, except for two pre-war dreadnoughts, the largest ships in the German navy were the battlecruisers/battleships SCHARNHORST and GNIESENAU [30,000 tons, a top speed in excess of 30 knots, and a main armament of 9X11" guns]. Raeder also had three Panzerschiffe [ADMIRAL SCHEER, ADMIRAL GRAF SPEE and DEUTSCHLAND [6x11" guns], six heavy cruisers, several light cruisers, and some 20 destroyers. And although she was almost built, the aircraft carrier GRAF ZEPPELIN was never completed [Goering refused to allow a Naval air service [a second carrier, SEYDLITZ, was broken up during construction].

Secondly, Rader was rather hidebound in his outlook. He was preparing to fight a battleship war a la WWI, in a war when battleships would no longer be the primary offensive weapon [Still, the last three battleship engagements in European history occurred in the Atlantic, and oceans north of Norway, the first two under Raeder's watch: BISMARCK/ HOOD, BISMARCK/ KING GEORGE V and RODNEY, SCHARNHORST/ DUKE OF YORK].

When war caught him early, Raeder embarked on a strategy of commerce warfare, using both surface vessels, submarines, mines, and armed merchantship comerce raiders. He also was an active participant in pushing Hitler to invade Norway to secure naval bases beyond the Royal navy's ability to blockade the German Navy.

Norway was a success,that sewed the seeds of future failure. The Germans took it [but with the conquest of France and its Atlantic coastline, they didn't really need it], but they lost fully half of their destroyers [10], and three of their cruisers, ships that would be sorely needed when Raeder contemplated supplying escorts for OPERATION SEA LION [he didn't have the ships to do the job].


Raeder presided over a very successful early war. At any one time, he had surface warships commerce raiding, his raiders [converted merchantmen] laying mines, and attacking shipping. But there were signs that all was not as well as it seemed. Raeder tended to micromanage his sea admirals too much [He chastized Adm. Marschall for failing to sink troop transports in Norway AFTER Marschall sank a British aircraft carrier with surface ships],  leading to temerity in the face of orders that almost cost him BISMARCK during her battle with HOOD. He downplayed, and underfunded U-boat development and construction when it seemed likely the U-boat was the Kriegsmarine's trump card in the Battle of the Atlantic. He failed to push vigorously for the aircraft carriers that might hve made a difference in the 'air gap'. And he refused to consider any course of action but his 'big ship strategy.

The end came for Raeder after a failed attack on a British convoy north of Norway on the Murmansk run by the pocket battleship LUETZOW nee DEUTSCHLAND, and the heavey cruiser ADMIRAL HIPPER. When Hitler, in a fury, threatened to cashier all the Kriegsmarine's capital ships, Rader threatened to resign. Hitler accepted the resignation, and replaced Raeder with Karl Doenitz [who would micromanage his U-boats to the point that the British were able to use that fact to destroy them]. But Doenitz did get Hitler to rescind the destruction order for the German fleet.

Some died in Norway [TIRPITZ and SCHARNHORST]. But others, e.g. the heavy cruiser PRINZ EUGEN, helped transport refugees fro East Prussia to the west, and furnished fire support for the Courland pocket.

Raeder was tried at Nuremburg for war crimes. He was convicted of waging aggressive wars, and other crimes, arising out of his part in Norway. Sentenced to 20 years, he was released in 1955 on the grounds of ill health.
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« Reply #455 on: April 25, 2018, 08:50:52 am »

After "Gentleman Johnny" Burgoyne and his army went into the sack at Saratoga, and after General Henry Clinton abandoned Philadelphia, retreating to New York, the British command thrashed around for a 'new' strategy. what they came up with was a replay of one of their earliest gambits of the revolution - an attack on the South.

Clinton, the now commander -in -chief, had led a proposed attack there in 1776, to no avail. But the British eyed the south as THE location where sizable numbers of Loyalists would flock to the King's banner [overlooking that New York and New Jersey/Pennsylvania had previously been the 'hotbeds of Tory loyalists who the British had merely to arm and loose on their countrymen - and weren't].

So Clinton and Cornwallis sailed south, a British column debauched northward from Florida, and in short order, the British army captured Savannah, Charleston, 'bagged' Benjamin Lincoln's army, smashed Horatio Gates' at Camden, and seemed poised to bring their plans to fruition. Things were going so well that Clinton left Cornwallis in charge, and returned to New York, and the arms of his mistress.

But all was NOT well. While it was true that a large number of Loyalists joined the British war effort [Tarleton's Legion had large numbers of them, Patrick Ferguson's command was almost totally composed of Loyalists], large numbers of Southerners were supporting the Revolution, making for a particularly nasty internecine war in the south. Even more Southerners, who might have remained neutral, were incensed by the British policy of arming, and promising to free, any slave who ran away to the British and joined the British Army. And finally, the southern theater was a full dimensional war. In addition to regular military operations, the south supported large scale [more Rebel than Loyalist] asymmetrical warfare, i.e. guerrilla warfare [ Francis Marion, Andrew Pickens], which put a premium on controlling supply lines, and fortifying strong points.

So the British and their supporters were spread thinner than Cornwallis might have wanted, but might have managed, IF he kept facing the likes of Horatio Gates. But no such luck. After Camden, Gates was replaced by Nathaniel Greene. And Greene was no Gates.

As the campaign developed, Cornwallis moved north, with Greene, always just out of reach luring him on. and as he did so, the first shoe dropped. Patrick Ferguson and his loyalists, covering Cornwallis' left flank, ranging to his wets, wee caught, trapped, and brought to battle by Colonial militia at King's Mountain. Ferguson was killed, as was most of his force. Next, in an effort to close with Greene, Cornwallis burned his supply train, and most of his supplies. Then when Greene split his forces in Cornwallis' face, Cornwallis followed suit. While Greene evaded Cornwallis, Daniel Morgan faced off with Tarleton's Legion at a place called "Hannah's Cowpens", or simply the "Cowpens". After some twenty minutes, Tarleton's Legion had been annihilated, and Morgan escaped to rejoin Greene. the stage was now set for the battle of Guilford Court House.

Green used Morgan's troop configuration from the Cowpens, placing militia in the front line, and Continentals and other militia behind them. And the American troops, including the militia proved to be a very hot problem for Cornwallis' regulars. They drove back the first line, and succeeded to a degree in pushing back the second. But the battle was such a close run thing that Cornwallis was forced to fire his artillery in the center of the battle, knowing full well he would be killing some of his own men. But it worked. Greene disengaged, leaving Cornwallis in command  of the field, and thus in the position to claim the victory.

But what a victory. Cornwallis had lost full one quarter of his army. He was out of supplies, and in the middle of North Carolina. The countryside was alive with marauding bands of Rebel guerrillas. And Greene and his army were on his flank. Cornwallis decided to move north, into Virginia, where he hoped to rendezvous with the Royal Navy. That was why he wound up at Yorktown, and why he abandoned the Deep south, and the Loyalists foolish enough to tie their wagon to his star.

Greene and his army [as well as the Rebel guerrillas], then began surrounding and capturing the various strong points still in British hands. The South fell to the Americans, while Cornwallis and his Army fell to George Washington.
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« Reply #456 on: April 25, 2018, 10:51:34 pm »

See "PzLdr history Facts" Archive, p.12
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« Reply #457 on: April 25, 2018, 11:05:52 pm »

Some two weeks after he had successfully assassinated Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the united States, and successfully [if breaking your leg is successful] escaping ford's Theater, the scene of the crime, John Wilkes Booth is run to ground at a Virginia Farm, and fatally wounded.

Booth, who had organized a plot to cripple the United states government by making attempts on the life of Lincoln and several members of his cabinet, was the only member of the plot to succeed in his mission. He then fled into Maryland where he was treated for his broken leg by Dr. Samuel Mudd, a southern sympathizer and possible member of Booth's cell, and where at Mary Seurrat's boarding house [a meeting place for the conspirators, who included Seurrat's son, who escaped, and Seurrat herself], he obtained a couple of firearms.

Booth then, despite Union land and naval patrols, managed to cross the Potomac into Virginia, where, to his surprise, he was not acclaimed as a hero, but was, rather grudgingly as a general rule, provided aid as he fled further south in the face of increasingly numerous, and active Union patrols.

The end came on a Virginia farm, in a barn where Booth and his companion were locked in by the farmer, who feared they would steal his horses. they were found by a Union patrol. when called out, booth's accomplice surrendered. booth refused to do so, and with the barn set afire, he was mortally wounded by a Union trooper who fired through a gap in the wall.

Booth was dragged out, crippled. He died three hours later.
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« Reply #458 on: April 27, 2018, 07:50:16 pm »

See "PzLdr History Facts" Archive, p. 12
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« Reply #459 on: April 29, 2018, 02:03:16 pm »

See "PzLdr History Facts" Archive, p.1
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« Reply #460 on: April 29, 2018, 02:06:42 pm »

See "PzLdr History Facts" Archive, p.12
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« Reply #461 on: May 01, 2018, 09:10:46 am »

See "PzLdr History Facts" Archive, p. 12
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« Reply #462 on: May 02, 2018, 05:00:41 pm »

1957: The Death of Senator Joseph McCarthy

He has been maligned, vilified, and his name is now shorthand for political extremism against free speech, and unfounded attacks without proof, 'smearing' their target.  But McCarthy, the junior Senator from Wisconsin, energized the political right against the influence of, and spying by, Communists and their fellow travelers in the U.S. government, and, indirectly, on such institutions as Hollywood [McCarthy concentrated on the government]. His Waterloo was the Army Hearings he led, where Dwight Eisenhower used them to cut him off at the knees. McCarthy wound up censured by the Senate, with no ability to write legislation, co-sign legislation, or hold any committee appointments.

McCarthy was, however, correct about the Communists having infested the government. Eisenhower's destruction of him put that truth  beyond the pale, and like the "Swiftboaters", what he he said, and did, was stood on its head by generations of detractors. McCarthy is buried in his home state of Wisconsin, a man, who to this day, is unfairly maligned.

2011: Bye, Bye Bin Laden

On this date in 2011, a piece of offal was swept from the world at large, as Osama Bin Laden met a SEAL that neither barked, balanced balls on its nose, nor ate fish. He just killed him.

The mastermind of the 9/11 tragedy was found hiding in Pakistan, right down the road from a Pakistani military school, and in a nightie raid, his account was marked 'paid'.

But then for reasons I cannot comprehend [except by the explanation Barack Obama was the Commander in chief], his body was neither bathed in pig blood, nor fed to dogs, but was rather, given a Muslim funeral on an American aircraft carrier, as if he were a regular enemy combatant, instead of the murderous piece of sh*t he was.
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« Reply #463 on: May 02, 2018, 05:02:50 pm »

See "PzLdr History Facts" Archive, p.13
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« Reply #464 on: May 05, 2018, 09:03:46 am »

St. Helena Island, is, as Col. Rheault's zinger about Ft. Reilly, Kansas, "equidistant from anyplace you'd rather be". And from 1815-1821, that was as true for Napoleon Bonaparte, former Emperor of the French, and current prisoner of His Brittanic Majesty, as true as true could be.

Afgter the defeat at Waterloo, Napoleon had fled first to Paris, then to the coast. His initial intention was to flee to the United States. but then, captured by H.M.S BELLERAPHON, he announced his desire to live in England. Instead, he wound up on a rock in the South Atlantic named St. Helena. And since the British owned it, he had, in a sense, gotten his wish.

The British choice of St. Helena was a result of Napoleon's previous escape from his then residence, Elba, back to mainland France, which resulted in the "Hundred Days". St. Helena was physical assurance that that wasn't going to happen again.

The British garrison on the island was ordered to treat Napoleon with the deference due a retired General [not royalty], and to keep an eye on him, and his retinue[Napoleon arrived with a suite of servants, doctors and hangers on, several officer-aides [but no troops]. Bonaparte was given Longwood House as a residence, and allowed prety much free range of the island. But, he couldn't leave.

By 1821, Napoleon appeared to be in poor health. In point of fact he was dying. And it appears from modern research that his death was caused, indirectly, by increasing doses of arsenic [Forensic pathologists have compared arsenic levels in locks of Napoleon's hair from different dates, with a detailed catalog of his health and medical symptoms kept by his valet]. It was the treatment he received for his perceived illnesses that apparently caused an ulcer to bleed out .

In any case, on this date in 1821, Napoleon Bonaparte, French General [ret.], and former Emperor of the French, as Napoleon I, died on a lonely, windswept island in the South Atlantic, where he remained until the British released his Body to France [his casket having been dropped during the disinterment, his body was remarkably undecayed, indicating the possibility of high levels of arsenic in the tissues]. Napoleon was returned to Paris and a massive welcome, and re-interred in Les Invalides.

It was there, in 1940, that Adolf Hitler, during his whirlwind tour of Paris, gazed down upon his tomb. apparently Napoleon didn't warn the Fuehrer about tangling with Russia. Or Hitler didn't listen.
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