[x]
Welcome to the Stink Eye Discussion Forum!
Join the Discussion! Click Here for Instant Registration.
The Stink Eye Conservative Forum; Politics, News, Republican Election Headquarters
September 26, 2018, 10:32:57 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 25 26 [27] 28 29 ... 42   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: PzLdr History Facts  (Read 33331 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
apples
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 37943



« Reply #390 on: February 15, 2018, 05:50:29 pm »

One of my pet peves is now a days they say so an so broke one of the old timers records.....they played less games then. Had jobs when not playing bb.

Football too....saying so and so broke someones record......they play more games!
Logged
apples
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 37943



« Reply #391 on: February 15, 2018, 05:54:34 pm »

Thanks for this one. Had asked you about it.
Logged
apples
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 37943



« Reply #392 on: February 15, 2018, 05:57:55 pm »

I Remember the IRA bombing news on TV back in the day.
Logged
apples
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 37943



« Reply #393 on: February 15, 2018, 05:59:37 pm »

Cromwell's body was disinterred, hanged, drawn and quartered.....yikes!
Logged
jafo2010
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7228


« Reply #394 on: February 16, 2018, 10:58:03 am »

And they use steroids today, which morphs them into something beyond mere humans.  Frankly, no one since about 1990 measures up to the players of the days when drugs were not part of the game.  People like Ruth and Mantle are still far superior than these pharmanoids of today!!!!!!!!!
Logged
PzLdr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 888



« Reply #395 on: February 19, 2018, 08:19:12 am »

Iwo Jima, was a volcanic island of no particular beauty , or economic worth. It was dominated by an extinct volcano, Mount Suribachi, located on the southwest end of the island, and occupied by over 20,000 Japanese troops. Because what Iwo Jima had was location, location, location. It was strategically located in a place where american airfields could serve as emergency landing strips for B-29 bombers damaged in raids on mainland Japan [and in fact would do so before the island was secured]. Indeed, to the northeast of Suribachi, the Japanese had three airfields of their own.

The Japanese also had a commander, General Kurabiyashi, who had studied in america. And although he had opposed war with America, Kurabiyashi was a patriot. So when he was assigned to defend Iwo Jima, he did his best to do so.

By the time U.S. Marines were going to invade the island, Japanese defensive strategy and tactics had morphed, at least partially [they still engaged in 'Banzai' charges when all was lost], from the early days of Guadalcanal, etc. The Japanese were no longer trying to re-conquer ground, or even defeat the Americans in a classic sense. Rather, their goal, both strategic and tactical, was to kill so many Americans in battles of attrition, that the Americans would sue for a brokered peace, not "Unconditional Surrender". Japan was now fighting a purely Clausewitzian war, i.e. "politics by other means".

The Americans had first run into this new approach on Saipan, Pelieu, and other islands in the Marshalls, and afterwards. But evern the Marines were not fully prepared for what awaited them on Iwo Jima.

Kurabiyashi had his troops dig in. Caves, tunnel systems, alternate firing positions, bunkers blown and carved out of rock. command posts and ammo bunkers deep underground. And, above all, using Suribachi to maximum effect. His orders to his troops were simple. Kill ten Americans for the loss of each Japanese soldier. And neither he, nor they, expected to survive the battle. He also ordered the troops, and especially his artillery, to allow the Americans to land unhindered. and not to open fire until they were exposed on the beach.

It took four days for the Marines to take Suribachi. The reenacted flag raising became the most iconic photo of the war in the Pacific, if not the entire war for Americans.

As the Marines moved north, they ran into more extensive defensive systems, in country more favorable to the Japanese. It took some five weeks to subdue the island [and some 3,000 Japanese troops remained in the caves and tunnels, the last surrendering in 1949].

Of the 20,000 plus Japanese on Iwo Jima, only some 200 plus surrendered. Between 17,000 and 18,000 were killed or committed suicide [Kuraiyashi among the latter]. The Marines lost approximately 7,000 dead. But some 2,500 B-29s subsequently landed on Iwo, saving their crews.It was one of the U.S. Marine Corps' finest moments.
Logged

You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
PzLdr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 888



« Reply #396 on: February 23, 2018, 10:40:50 am »

Washington had been at war with the Congress, almost since the time he took command of the Continental Army, over whether it should be a militia force, or a professional army. Ever jealous of the accretion of power by anyone bu themselves, the Congress favored militias. And the result showed a mixed bag. Some State units 'of the line' performed well. So did specialized units like Daniel Morgan's Virginia Riflemen. Even some ordinary militias could perform well. But most militias cut and run when faced with the discipline and the bayonets of British regulars.

And the answer to Washington's quandry arrived at what might well have been his nadir -Valley Forge.

Baron [and general] Friedrich von Steuben was neither. But he had been a Prussian officer who served with distinction under the command of the soldier of the age, Frederick the Great. And Von Steuben not only served quite capably as an infantry officer, but performed so well in that capacity that he was called to serve on Frederick the Great's staff. But Steuben eventually left the King of Prussia's service, looking for new worlds to conquer [and fatten his bank account]. The result was that in the winter of 1778, Steuben arrived at Valley Forge, via an introduction to Benjamin Franklin by the French, and an introduction to Washington by Franklin.

Steuben saw three areas of immediate concern: discipline, training and tactics, and hygiene. He attacked all three.

Steuben formed a model company of 100 men. Since he didn't speak any English, he worked through a translator, cursing in German and French [He also wrote a training and tactical manual that was translated into English by the Americans on Washington's staff]. Steuben taught his company how to march, change formation, advance and retreat. He also taught them the Prussian manual of arms, and how to fire and reload in the Prussian manner, which was superior to the British method. He then drilled his company relentlessly, despite the weather, until re-loading became a reflex they did without thinking. Topping that off with Bayonet drill, he then had each man in his company train a unit on their own, with Steuben's supervision. By Spring, the continental Army's discipline, proficiency and Esprit de Corps had risen appreciably.

Coupled with those improvements were the lessons Steuben taught the Continentals about where to locate latrines, the benefits of personal hygiene, and the benefits of a well ordered, clean camp. Losses to disease dropped, while the number of effectives increased.

Washington was so impressed by Steuben, he recommended that the Congress make him Inspector General of the Army, which they did. Steuben was appointed a major general, and served Washington for the rest of the war [Unfortunately Frederick the Great's gifts as a tactician, strategist and commander did not rub off on Steuben. He was an indifferent battlefield commander]. And after the war, Steuben was awarded a large estate in the state of New York for his services.

And the Army he created that winter? At Monmouth it went on to royally kick  British ass, in a toe to toe battle that Washington personally led after MG Charles Lee was ordered from the field. For the rest of the revolution, the continental Army gave as good as it got, usually more so. and it was largely because of the efforts of a refugee German officer who braved the snow at Valley Forge to train an Army.
Logged

You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
PzLdr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 888



« Reply #397 on: February 26, 2018, 07:54:53 am »

One of the military provisions of the Versailles Treaty that ended WW I in the West banned Germany from having an air force. Germany was allowed a 100,000 man army [but denied armored vehicles], and a small navy [with obsolete battleships, and a replacement policy that would prevent the resurgence of a High Seas Fleet]. But no air force. And from an Allied perspective that made sense. With memories of Richtofen, Boelcke, Voss, et al fresh in their memories, a German Air force was the last thing they wanted to see in the skies over Europe. Not surprisingly, the Germans did not share their view.

So, as with many other of the provisions of the Versailles Treaty, the Germans worked around the ;provisions related to air power, and they did it in several ways.

The Germans were allowed mail planes and commercial aircraft. they grabbed those loopholes with both hands. What was eventually the Junkers Ju 52 bomber/transport plane started out as a mail plane. The soon to be main bomber Heinkel He-111 bomber began life as a commercial airliner.

And then there was the need for pilots. Aside from WW I pilots who worked for the mail service, and the commercial airlines, the number of glider clubs that sprang up all over Germany was astounding. A good number of early WW II German fighter aces started out in glider clubs.

Still, German air power could go only so far in the shadows. And in 1935, Adolf Hitler, using an announced upgrade of the RAF by the British, announced the existence of a new German Air force, the Luftwaffe [literally 'air arm' or weapon], to be commanded by his number two man, a former fighter pilot, holder of the Pour Le Merite, and last commander of Richtofen's fighter squadron, Hermann Goering.

And Goering did not come to the senior ranks of the Luftwaffe alone. He was joined at the Air Ministry by Erdhard Milch, the now former director of the airline Lufthansa, and former pilot Ernst Udet [who, while barnstorming in America, had purchased two Curtiss dive bombers, which became the 'Daddy' of the Junkers Ju-87 dive bomber, the legendary STUKA

The senior ranks of the Luftwaffe were filled by a combination of WW I pilots [Bruno Loerzer, etc,], as well as a number of Army transfers, e.g., Albert Kesselring, Hans Jeschonneck, and the first Chief of the Luftwaffe Staff, Gen. Weaver.

And when the announcement came, the Lutfwaffe was already a formidable force of fighters, including the double winged Heinkel 123 [which would see service in Russia as a ground attack aircraft], the new Messerschmitt Me-109, the twin engined Me-110 [the 'Zerstoerer', or destroyer]; bombers, the He-111, the Dornier Do 117, and the redoubtable Ju-52, the STUKA divebomber, and a host of specialized aircraft.

Thus, at the stroke of a pen, one of the most modern tactical air forces in the world was presented to the world, adding not just another military arrow to Hitler's quiver, but a psychological one as well.

But first looks were deceiving. Despite an exceptional performance in the Spanish Civil War, there were deficiencies in the Luftwaffe, which while overlooked at the time, would herald its ultimate failure and demise.

Perhaps no more serious long term disaster for the Luftwaffe occurred when Walter Weaver, the first Luftwaffe chief of Staff was killed in a training accident [Weaver, an Army transfer was learning how to fly].

Weaver was the leading proponent for the creation of a strategic four engined bomber for the Luftwaffe [he called it the 'Urals bomber']. In fact, he was the only proponent for it among the senior Luftwaffe generals. Goering was concerned with numbers. Both the Luftwaffe generals who had bee pilots in WW I, and those who transferred in from the Army were mainly concerned with the creation of a TACTICAL air force, to work in conjunction with, and in support of, the German  Army. And that concept, and configuration won out.

The Luftwaffe would be a nonpareil as an umbrella for the Wehrmacht, and as its flying artillery. But the range of the German fighters was unimpressively short [During the Battle of Britain, Me-109s were incapable of staying on station to support bombers over London for more than some fifteen minutes]. The range of the bombers was not much better [ In the USSR, the Luftwaffe was unable to reach Soviet industries that had been moved out of range - over the Urals]. Additionally, since prewar bomber design relied on speed, rather than armor and armament, as a bomber's defense, Luftwaffe bombers were notoriously underprotected from enemy fighters. and to reach the speeds thought desirable, the German bombers were also built with smaller, lighter bomb loads. In short, the Luftwaffe had little to no strategic capability.

On top of that, Udet, who was in charge of production tried to ride his one claim to fame, the 'dive bomber' concept to death [He eventually died a suicide]. So even as the Germans began to design and try to develop four engined strategic bombers, Udet placed a requirement on them that they be capable of diving; hopelessly delaying the Germans' ability to field a strategic bomber for the rest of the war.

And while the Allies could produce numerous combat aircraft, while developing many major new types, such as the P-51 Mustang fighter [the British alone were outproducing the Germans in aircraft - in 1940], German efforts into diversified aircraft design, coupled with an aircraft industry incapable of production on the allied scale, meant that fighter planes becoming obsolescent, like the Me-109 were continually modifed with more armor, and heavier weapons at the cost of maneuverability, and the deployment of successful new types of fighters was basically limited to the Focke Wulf FW 190 and its variants.

And even Luftwaffe breakthroughs, like the Me-262 jet fighter were fatally delayed by a Hitler requirement that it serve as a bomber. So, instead of being put into production and deployed in 1943, the Me-262 appeared tow late in the war to have any effect [as did the Arado jet bomber].

The Luftwaffe's last hurrah was Operation BODENPLATTZE, during the Battle of the Bulge. In early January, 1945, 800 Luftwaffe aircraft sortied against Allied airfields supporting the Americans fighting in the 'Bulge'. By the end of the day, with little to show for their efforts [the allies would quickly replace their losses], the Germans had lost 300 planes. And with the cumulative loss of experienced pilots [you never rotated to the rear], the lack of fuel, and the ability to train new pilots, even extreme tactics, such as suicide pilots ramming American bombers could overcome the twin truths: the Allies had air supremacy over German air space, and the Luftwaffe was an utterly defeated force. But that force began its rise, and fall, on this date in 1935.
Logged

You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
PzLdr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 888



« Reply #398 on: February 26, 2018, 08:03:31 am »

In the aftermath of the fight for the old Imperial Vietnamese city of Hue, American and South Vietnamese troops make a horrifying discovery. They begin to find mass graves of South Vietnamese citizens, with, in many cases, their hands tied behind their backs, and all of whom had been murdered by the Viet Cong.

The VC had fought in Hue for some 25 days. and somehow, during that time, either using lists, informants, agents, or all three, they found time to round up civilians they thought to be loyal to the south Vietnamese government , and in the best Socialist manner, take them to prepared mass graves and kill them [think Katyn forest with bamboo].

The death toll was estimated from just short of 3,000 to just short of 6,000. As far as I know, one one was ever charged with, or convicted of this massacre. Something for our Socialist loving Millennials to contemplate.
Logged

You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
apples
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 37943



« Reply #399 on: February 26, 2018, 12:06:25 pm »

And they use steroids today, which morphs them into something beyond mere humans.  Frankly, no one since about 1990 measures up to the players of the days when drugs were not part of the game.  People like Ruth and Mantle are still far superior than these pharmanoids of today!!!!!!!!!

Very true.
Logged
jafo2010
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7228


« Reply #400 on: February 26, 2018, 03:38:37 pm »

Millenials could not find their posterior with both hands.  Plan *ss dumb as stumps!
Logged
PzLdr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 888



« Reply #401 on: February 27, 2018, 09:58:32 am »

In 1863, a sea change occurred in the handling of Civil War prisoners. Up to that time, most prisoners were 'paroled', to sit out the war until they were 'exchanged' for a prisoner, or prisoners, from the other side, based on a numerical value system [for example, a Lieutenant might be exchanged for a counterpart or for, say, five privates]. At that point the paroled prisoner could return to combat with no potential ramifications.

But in 1863, the Union demanded that Black Federal troops be included in the parole/exchange system, and the confederates, predictably refused. The Union then ended the parole system, and kept the prisoners they took. The Rebels followed suit. The ground had now been laid for a tragedy of epic proportions.

Civil War POW camps, on both sides were hellholes. At one in the North, civilians, for a price, could mount stairs to a platform and look at Confederate prisoners, in the stockade below. since that camp was located on the Great Lakes, and the Southerners lacked warm clothing, and medicine, the death rate was sickeningly high. But it paled in comparison with the Union POW camp at Elmira, N.Y., hard against the Canadian border.

But then came Camp Sumter, known today by its location, as Andersonville. Built with Slave labor, the stockade enclosed some 16 acres. In an eeire foretelling of the Nazi Death Camps, Andersonville was built near a rail line, but well away from any populated area. Barracks for prisoners were never  constructed. the main source of drinking water was a stream that ran through the camp. the camp was designed to hold a maximum of 10,000 prisoners.

The camp's Commandant was a Swiss national who had taken up the Confederate cause, Captasin Henry Wirz. Wirz, after a short spell of combat duty at the beginning of the war, had been transferred to Provost General John Winder's staff. He had been an officer involved principally in moving prisoners, and in prisoner exchange until his assignment to Camp Sumter. From the get go, everything went wrong.

The camp wound up holding not 10,000 prisoners, but 30,000. The prisoners lived in holes in the ground, with some covered with pieces of canvas, or scraps of wood. The food was monotonous, not particularly healthful, and erratic in its delivery. The stream became polluted and disease ridden due to the bodily needs of the prisoners, for who it was still the only source of water. Guards brutalized the prisoners, and killed anyone who crossed an internal "death line" [a procedure also adopted by the SS]. In addition, gangs of longer held prisoners terrorized newcomers, robbing, beating, and even killing them to a point where the other prisoners rose against them, and in one of the war's odditites, were allowed to try the criminals by Wirz, who then carried out the death sentences they handed down.

Several prisoners managed to escape from Andersonville, and found Sherman's Army on the March to the Sea. A cavalry raid by Stoneman's cavalry failed to reach the camp, but Georgians suffered some for the treatment of the Union prisoners, now public knowledge in Sherman's Army.

Andersonville was eventually liberated. But over one quarter of the prisoners sent there had died. And the Union Army wanted someone to pay for that. Winder was dead. But Wirz was not.

Wirz was tried by a military court. His defense basically sought to shift the blame to his higher ups, claiming his requests for food and medicine were ignored, and that despite his protests, more and more prisoners were sent to his camp. Unfortunately for Wirz, he couldn't shift the blame for his guards' brutality, the lack of improvement in the camp's facilities, or the high death rate he did nothing to prevent on the higher ups.

Wirz was the only man, on either side of the Civil War, hanged for his treatment of prisoners. and those prisoners started arriving at Andersonville on this day in 1864.
Logged

You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
PzLdr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 888



« Reply #402 on: March 01, 2018, 09:31:31 am »

He was named for a Major League catcher who was his father's idol, Mickey Cochrane. A natural athlete, gifted in both baseball and football, he was nicknamed the 'Commerce Comet' [He grew up in commerce, Oklahoma]. His father and uncle taught him to switch hit. And although he won a football scholarship to Oklahoma, he chose baseball. And Pinstripes. And from 1951 to 1968, Mickey Charles Mantle, "The Mick" was  the heart and soul of 12 pennant winning, and 7 World Series winning New York Yankees teams.

Mantle came up in 1950. to say he had a bad beginning would be charitable. Sent back to the minors, it took a visit from his father, with an offer to get Mickey a job in the lead mines, to get his focus back. He returned to the majors for the 1951 season, and never looked back.

In 1951, Mantle was known not only for his power, but his speed [He still, I believe, holds the record for speed from home to first base for a lefty].So if he was in a slump, he'd bunt his way on. And his speed made him a force in the outfield. and led to the injury that hampered him, increasingly, for the rest of his career.

The 'leader' of the Yankees in 1951 was an aging Joe DiMaggio [it would be his last season]. Hampered by painful bone spurs, and possibly envious of Mantle's physical gifts, DiMaggio not only didn't take Mantle under his wing, he never spoke to him - until Game Two of the World Series against the New York Giants [He would also, for Old Timers' Games have it written into his contract that he would be called onto the field last - AFTER Mantle].

In Game Two, Mantle was playing Right Field, DiMaggio was in center. Tthe Yankees manger, Casey Stengel, told Mantle to take everything hit to not only right, but right center as well, to spare DiMaggio's legs, unless DiMaggio called him off. What Stengel didn't tell Mantle was that DiMaggio never called for a ball unless he was absolutely sure he would get it.

So Mantle was running full bore for a pop up to right center, when, almost upon it, he heard DiMaggio say he had it. Mantle put on the brakes, caught his cleats in a drainage grill, and tore out his knee. As he lay on the field, he then had Joe D. speak to him for the first time, telling him not to move because they were bringing a stretcher for him. Mantle's Series was over.

In 1952, with DiMaggio gone, Mantle became the leader in the clubhouse.  But it was a much happier, looser clubhouse than it had been. And despite pain, and injuries, Mantle soldiered on, although with rapidly declining speed [osteomyolitis will do that to you].

In 1956, Mantle hit .353, with 52 HRs and 130 RBIs. He led both Leagues in all three categories, winning both the Triple Crown, and the first of three MVPs.

In 1961 Mantle and team mate Roger Maris enlivened the season with an ongoing 'competition' to break Babe Ruth's single season HR record. Mantle was forced out due to an infection, having hit 54, while Maris went on to a record 61 on the last day of the season [off Tracy Stollard]. What got lost in the ballyhoo was that the Yankees, as a team set a new record for home runs that stood for over three decades [the three catchers, Howard, Berra and Blanchard combined for 60].

Mantle's skill declined with increasing speed as the Yankees became also rans in the mid-60s. with the owners, Topping and Webb, trying to make the team more desirable by cutting payroll, may of the Yankees were let go. But not Mantle. The face of the franchise, Mantle was transferred to first base, where he languished through the 1968 season, his worst ever.

Mantle's only regret [aside from no longer being able to play] was finishing his career with a less than.300 BA, because he hung on a year too long. But his career stats were amazing. Mantle played on 12 pennant winning clubs [1951, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964], and 7 World Champion Teams [1951, 1952, 1953, 1956, 1958, 1961, 1962].His career batting average was.298. He hit 536 career HRs, had 2,415 hits, 1,509 RBIs, 3 MVPs, one Golden glove [1962], one triple crown, and was an All Star twenty times. In World Series play, he, at the time of his death, held the record for most home runs [18], most RBIs [40], and most runs scored [42].

Mickey Mantle received over 80% of the writers' votes when he went into the Baseball Hall of Fame on the first ballot. On a personal note, I was 6 when the Mick started with the Yankees full time. I graduated from college the year he retired. In sum, I grew up watching Mickey Mantle. All the kids in my neighborhood tried to run the bases like he did [especially the home run trot]. We creased our Yankee caps the way he did. We all wanted shirts with the number "7" on the back. Everyone wanted to play center field like Mickey. He was our hero, and my personal idol. In sports, he still is.
Logged

You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
PzLdr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 888



« Reply #403 on: March 04, 2018, 11:09:12 am »

PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURATIONS:

Two of my personal least favorite Presidents are inaugurated on this day.

1861: Abraham Lincoln is sworn in as  the 16th President of the United States. Lincoln, the first Republican President, wins in a three way race, with the Democrat vote split between former VP Jon C. Breckenridge, who represents the more hardline, southern slaveholders, and Stephen Douglass, who is the official Democrat nominee.

Lincoln extends an olive branch to the Southerners, promising to take no action against slavery where it exists, but clearly stating he will not accept disunion. When Southern states secede, war follows.

Lincoln, in two terms in office, will crush the South. He will also suspend Habeas Corpus, exile political opponents, and make a mockery of the 10th Amendment. It is Lincoln who will turn the states of a republic into satrapies of the Federal government.


1933: "We have nothing to fear but fear itself". IMHO, we had a lot more to fear, like the man speaking those words, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Inaugurated on this date, FDR began a mammoth growth of Federal power unseen before, and the birth of the nanny state. An authoritarian to his fingertips, Roosevelt will spin a series of Federal agencies and programs that will prolong, not end the Great Depression [world War II will do that]. And when the USSC throws a wrench in the works by finding several of FDR's pet programs unconstitutional, FDR will seek to enlarge, or 'pack' the court to make it more FDR friendly [he'll fail on that  one]

FDR will bring to his foreign policy a hatred and loathing of the Germans that goes back, at least, to the First World War, if not earlier. It will inform much of a foreign policy that saw the U.S. recognize the Soviet Union [and get overrun with NKVD and GRU operatives in the Federal government up to and including the White House], and because FDR saw himself as an 'expert' on China, a foreign policy that embroiled itself in Asia, as an opponent to former ally, Japan, and led, eventually to Pearl Harbor.

A President that eventually worked against its strongest ally [Great Britain] while playing 'footsie' with the then worst butcher of the century, Josef Stalin [ "Uncle Joe"], Roosevelt eschewed the voluntary 2 term limit taken by every President since Washington, and was serving his fourth term when he was killed by a cerebral hemmorage.


1776: HOWE GETS HAD. THE AMERICANS OCCUPY THE DORCHESTER HEIGHTS.

The key to holding Boston was neither in Boston itself, nor the Charles neck, where the British had fought the Battle of Breed's [Bunker] Hill in 1775. Rather, he who held the Dorchester Heights, held Boston, because the Dorchester Heights, maned by artillery, commanded Boston Harbor. And if the British fleet couldn't anchor in Boston Harbor, the British Army couldn't stay in Boston itself.

The British were aware of this fact, yet did nothing during their occupation of , and besiegement in, Boston, to occupy the heights, probably in the belief that they were no threat, due to the Colonials' lack of heavy artillery. It was a fatal mistake.

The Colonials did, in fact, have heavy artillery. It just wasn't in Boston, nor nearby. It was at Fort Ticonderoga which had been captured by Benedict Arnold and Ethan Allen and his 'Green Mountain Boys' the previous autumn. The question was, for the Colonial commander, George Washington, how to  get the guns from there to Boston. The answer was Henry Knox.

Henry Knox was a Patriot, a bookstore owner [and a self taught soldier - from reading his books], and an artillerist. He conceived, and caried out, a mid-winter operation that saw Knox, and a contingent of troops travel to Ticonderoga, build sleds, pulled by oxen, and haul the guns back to the Continental camp surrounding Boston.

On the night of March, 4th, 2,000 troops, using straw to minimize the noise of the gun carriages and troop movements [a trick Washington will use again], climb the Dorchester heights, and dig a series of entrenchments, fortifications, and gun emplacements. When the British wake the next morning, they are horrified to see the guns overlooking Boston Harbor [Howe will declaqim that no British Army unit could have done the same, nor as rapidly]. As a result, the British Army, and numerous Loyalist citizens, evacuate, under truce, Boston shortly afterwards.



1789: THE UNITED STATES IS GOVERNED UNDER THE NEWLY RATIFIED CONSTITUTION FOR THE FIRST TIME.


The United States Congress, meeting in New York city, operates for the first time, under the provisions of the U.S. Constitution. Neither the full number of Congressmen, nor Senators are present, due to the unfinished business of amending the document to include the Bill of Rights, and other amendments. Once that is accomplished, the last two states sign on, and the full congress begins its function. How far we've strayed...



1944: LEPKE FRIES

Louis "Lepke" Buchalter, "Judge Louis" to the mob, one of the inventors of labor racketeering [the other was Tommy "Two Fingers Brown" Lucchese], and a major player in New York organized crime, is executed in the electric chair, at Sing Sing Prison.

Lepke [a corruption of a childhood nickname, 'Lepkula'] had started as a teenage extortionist of push cart operators on the Lowe East Side, while still a teenager. He partnered with Jacob "Gurrah" [from the way he said 'Get out of here'] Shapiro, and eventually the two joined "Little Auggie" Orgen's strike breaking operation. But Orgen would only work for the Unions, and Lepke saw more profit in working both sides of the street. So he and Shapiro killed Orgen, and took over his operation.

It was during this period that Lepke saw how by controlling a critically placed Union, like the Fur Cutters, or Truckers, he could extort, and even control whole industries, initially the fur industry, and via the truckers, the fashion industry.

Lepke had been part of Arnold Rothstein's "All Stars", a collection of the future grandees of organized crime that included Meyer Lansky, 'Legs' Diamond, Dutch Schultz, and a young Italian named Charlie [later 'Lucky'] Luciano.

So when Luciano organized organized crime beyond the Mafia's fiver families, Lepke was a natural member of the Board of Directors, second only to Luciano in influence. The arrangement worked well. Territories and areas of influence were drawn. Corrupted officials were shared. And a non-denominational' method of rule enforcement was created - Murder, Inc.

Lepke had a pivotal role in Murder, Inc.'s creation. It was he who recommended the Happy Maione and Abe Reles crews to handle all mob sanctioned murders. It was Lepke who passed the murder "contracts" from the 'Board', through Albert Anastasia, to Murder, Inc.

But as time went on, Lepke got sloppy. First, he began using Murder, Inc. for his own personal hits. Second, he began ordering executions in front of non-participants in that particular murder, which made for a prosecutable murder prosecution under New York law.

Lepke had gone underground when the Feds started looking for him on a narcotics charge. Parnoid, he began ordering wholesale batches of murders on anyone he thought was a threat. That included a candy store own named Joe Rosen. rosen had been a trucker, until Lepke forced him out of business. Lepke put rosen into the candy store, but Rosen would nerither forgive, nor shut up. so Lepke had him added to his list of victims. But there was one problem. Lepke had ordered his own man, 'Mendy' Weiss to kill Rosen. In front of Abe Reles

And now Lepke got caught in converging storms. Luciano, and the Commission, deemed Lepke's murder campaign 'bad for business'. So they put pressure on Lepke [who had spent his entire exile in Brooklyn] to cut a deal with the Feds. Lepke voluntariy surrendered to J.Edgar Hoover personally, with the introductions made by Walter Winchell. It was then that he found out no deal, especially covering New York prosecutions, had been made.

And then Abe Reles, suspecting he had moved up on the hit list, rolled. Aside from his Murder, Inc. compatriots, Reles was able to deliver up Lepke, for the Joe Rosen murder [along with Mendy Weiss and Louis Capone (no relative of Al's)]. Luciano only intervened in Reles' case when Reles prepared to testify against Albert Anastasia. At that point [indicative it could have been done at any point], Reles got thrown out of a seventh story window at the Half Moon hotel in Coney Island - where he was being held in protective custody].

Lepke, Weiss and Capone went to the chair at Sing Sing on March 4, 1944. Lepke's rackets were subsumed by the Five Families [another possible reason for allowing Lepke's death]. Lepke remains the only major gangster executed in the United States to this day.


1944: THE 8TH AIR FORCE BOMBS BERLIN FOR THE FIRST TIME

On the same day that Lepke met his final judgement, the U.S. 8th Air force undertook its first raid on Berlin.

Although Berlin had been regularly bombed by the RAF, the U.S. Air Force had refrained from targeting Berlin for several reasons. First, the U.S. bombers were trained for precision bombing. That meant daylight. Second, there were no fighter escorts capable of reaching anywhere near Berlin's air space, let alone the city itself. That would expose the bombers to unchallenged enemy fighters going to, and coming from, Berlin. Third, the Berlin air defenses were formidable. There were day fighters. There were night fighters. And then were bands of anti-aircraft guns, including batteries of the redoubtable 88 mm cannon in its anti-aircraft role.

Still, by March, 1944, the RAF was reeling from exhaustion and heavy losses. So to spell the British, the 8th Air Force sent over 10 squadrons of heavy bombers to bomb Berlin. To say their debut was fiasco is over-complimentary. Only one [1] bomber dropped its load on Berlin. The rest offloaded elsewhere. But as March went on, the Mighty 8th kept returning with more, and more devastating results.
 

Logged

You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
PzLdr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 888



« Reply #404 on: March 05, 2018, 08:40:42 am »

He led the Soviet Union for almost three decades. He was responsible for more deaths than anyone but Mao Zedong. And he died in his dacha on this date in 1953.

Josip Vasserianovich Dzugashvili started life not in Russia, but in the province of Georgia. The son of a drunken cobbler, and a very religious mother, the man who would become known as Stalin, was intended by her to become a priest. But seditious readings, mostly on Marxism weaned Stalin away from the priesthood, and led to him being expelled from the seminary, and into revolutionary politics, and bank robbery.

Stalin joined Lenin's Bolsheviks, and became, via his bank robberies, a very important asset to the cash starved Lenin. And for reasons known only to Lenin, Stalin became the Party's 'expert' on the question of national minorities within Lenin's envisaged Soviet State.

When the Revolution was co-opted by the Bolsheviks, Stalin was doing a stint of exile in Siberia. With a withered arm [like Kaiser Wilhelm II], and supposedly with webbed toes on one foot, Stalin had been exempt from the military draft in world War I. Between bank robberies and political agitation in Baku and other areas of the Caucasus, Koba, as he was then known, married a fellow revolutionary and fasthered a son [Jacob, who died in German captivity, apparently a suicide, in World War II.

With Lenin's seizure of power, Stalin was appointed General Secretary of the Communist Party, in part because no one else wanted the job. It was a grave mistake on their part.

Stalin began, almost immediately, placing his own acolytes in positions of power throughout all levels of Soviet government, and beuracracy. Surviving a last ditch attempt by a dying Lenin to replace him, Stalin steadily eliminated his enemies and rivals through exile and murder [Trotsky], or show trials and murder [Kamanev, Zinoviev, Bukharin, Ryukov, etc., as well as his generals [Tuchachevsky, Blukyer, etc.], and his own secret police chiefs [Yagoda, Yezhov].

Stalin also found time, in his drive to industrialize the soviet union to cause the deaths, by either direct or indirect methods, of several million people [the Ukrainian famine, the Purges, and the gulag. But by 1929 he was the undisputed master of the Soviet State. And then came Adolf Hitler.

Stalin made an alliance with Hitler, via a "Non-Aggression Pact". It is sometimes forgotten that our 'doughy' Soviet Ally had invaded Poland with the Germans [17 SEP 1939], and carved it, and much of the rest of Eastern Europe, up in accord with the secret protocols of that Pact during 1939 -1940. In fact, Stalin overstepped his boundary with Hitler, with threats to Romania [Hitler's principal source of petroleum], and an invasion of Finland, where the Red Army's initial performance was substandard at best [and observed by the Germans].

Stalin's plan was apparently predicated on the belief that Germany and the Western Allies would be locked in combat for a protracted period of years. So it was with some dismay that Stalin saw the West fall in a period of less than three moths. He now faced Hitler alone.

In June, 1941, Stalin's scheming proved to be of no avail. On the 22nd of June, 3.5 million German and allied troops invaded the Soviet Union. In the war that followed, the Soviet Union lost some 7 million soldiers and some 27 million civilians to the German invaders. And yet, when the Allies won the war, Stalin sent Soviet POWs, and civilian slave laborers who had been forcibly impressed by the Germans to the Gulag. Others, who had voluntarily [often under deplorable conditions] served the Germans were returned home and killed.

After the war, many Soviet citizens hoped that the excesses of the pre-war period were a thing of the past. They weren't. Stalin went after artists, the Leningrad party apparatus, and Soviet Jews. At the time of his death, Stalin was preparing the "Doctors' Plot" show trials [which also had a strong anti-Semitic tone, largely because Stalin was an anti-Semite].

Stalin was in his Dacha, outside Moscow when he was felled by a stroke. Because everyone feared to disturb him, he was not found until the next day, laying on the floor in a pool of his own urine. When he finally expired, his 'heirs', including Malenkov, Khruschev, and Lavrenti Beria, were gathered at his bedside like vultures watching something die. They left almost immediately, to begin the fight for succession that would see Khruschev eventually triumph.

Stalin had brought the Soviet Union from an agricultural country to an industrialized super power. He had expanded the USSR's borders far beyond those of the old Russian empire. And he did it by greasing the rails of progress with blood. Unbelievable rivers of blood.
Logged

You can get more with a smile, a handshake and a gun than you can with a smile and a handshake - Al Capone
Pages: 1 ... 25 26 [27] 28 29 ... 42   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Contact Us by Email
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!