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 21 
 on: October 07, 2018, 11:50:27 pm 
Started by PzLdr - Last post by PzLdr
See "PzLdr History Facts" Archive, p.21, Che Guevara thread

 22 
 on: October 07, 2018, 09:49:20 am 
Started by apples - Last post by apples
https://www.apnews.com/8234f0b8a6194d8b89ff79f9b0c94f35/Kavanaugh-is-confirmed:-Senate-Oks-Supreme-Court-nominee



WASHINGTON (AP) ? Brett Kavanaugh was sworn in Saturday night as the 114th justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, after a wrenching debate over sexual misconduct and judicial temperament that shattered the Senate, captivated the nation and ushered in an acrimonious new level of polarization ? now encroaching on the court that the 53-year-old judge may well swing rightward for decades to come.

Even as Kavanaugh took his oath of office in a quiet private ceremony, not long after the narrowest Senate confirmation in nearly a century and a half, protesters chanted outside the court building across the street from the Capitol.

The climactic 50-48 roll call capped a fight that seized the national conversation after claims emerged that he had sexually assaulted women three decades ago ? allegations he emphatically denied. Those accusations transformed the clash from a routine struggle over judicial ideology into an angry jumble of questions about victims? rights, the presumption of innocence and personal attacks on nominees.WASHINGTON (AP) ? Brett Kavanaugh was sworn in Saturday night as the 114th justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, after a wrenching debate over sexual misconduct and judicial temperament that shattered the Senate, captivated the nation and ushered in an acrimonious new level of polarization ? now encroaching on the court that the 53-year-old judge may well swing rightward for decades to come.

Even as Kavanaugh took his oath of office in a quiet private ceremony, not long after the narrowest Senate confirmation in nearly a century and a half, protesters chanted outside the court building across the street from the Capitol.

The climactic 50-48 roll call capped a fight that seized the national conversation after claims emerged that he had sexually assaulted women three decades ago ? allegations he emphatically denied. Those accusations transformed the clash from a routine struggle over judicial ideology into an angry jumble of questions about victims? rights, the presumption of innocence and personal attacks on nominees.

 23 
 on: October 07, 2018, 09:45:37 am 
Started by apples - Last post by apples
https://www.apnews.com/8234f0b8a6194d8b89ff79f9b0c94f35/Kavanaugh-is-confirmed:-Senate-Oks-Supreme-Court-nominee

 24 
 on: October 07, 2018, 12:39:11 am 
Started by PzLdr - Last post by PzLdr
See "PzLdr History Facts" Archive, p. 20

 25 
 on: October 05, 2018, 11:08:26 pm 
Started by PzLdr - Last post by PzLdr
The movie was "War Drums". It starred Alan Ladd. It was Charles Bronson's first movie.

 26 
 on: October 05, 2018, 11:02:04 pm 
Started by PzLdr - Last post by PzLdr
When you think of train robberies in the 19th century, you usually envisage wide open, desolate spaces, and the Wild Bunch, Sam Bass, or the James-Younger Gang. and you might surmise that answered the where and who of the first train robbery. you'd be wrong.

It was on October 6, 1866 that the first robbery of a moving train occurred. In Indiana. By the Reno brothers. With a haul of over $10,000. The formula was simple. Stop a train in a remote area, away from prying eyes, and posses, and rob it. It offered, initially, far less potential resistance then a town full of armed citizens, and gave the outlaws a 'leg up' on any posse formed to track them. It was such a 'natural' that some outlaws specialized totally or mostly, in trains [Butch Cassidy and the wild Bunch], while others, like the James-younger gang diversified into railroads and stagecoaches, while still predominantly robbing banks.

And the Reno gang? They were captured in 1868. Except for one brother, already in prison, the rest were taken from the jail they were held in, awaiting trial, by a gang of vigiliantes and hanged. They were 'immortalized' in a movie where J.Carrol Nash portrayed one of the brothers. I believe Forrest Tucker was in it as well.

 27 
 on: October 05, 2018, 10:52:18 pm 
Started by PzLdr - Last post by PzLdr
The war on the border in 1863 had been particularly vicious. Southern women, relatives of Confederate irregular "Bushwhackers" had been held in a hotel in Kansas City on the orders of the Department head, Thomas Ewing, Union Major General, and William Tecumseh Sherman's brother -in-law. But the building had collapsed, killing or injuring a number of the women, including relatives of Cole younger, and the deceased sister of William "Bloody Bill" Anderson.

The response was the attack  by 300 guerrillas and 150 Confederate regulars [who did not participate], led by William Clarke Quantrill, on the then capital of Kansas, Lawrence. By the time the rebels rode away, most of the town was in flames, and somewhere between 150 and 162 men and teenaged boys had been murdered. Quantrill lost one man, who had remained in Lawrence, drunk. The Union cavalry never got close to him.

As the summer ended, and the seasons changed, the leaves began to fall along the Little Blue and Sni-a-bar rivers in Missouri, robbing the guerrillas of the brush that hid them, and gave them their nickname. So Quantrill and his men began their march south, with the intention of wintering in Confederate, and, allegedly, friendly Texas.

As they approached the Missouri-Indian Territory border, Quantrill's men spied a Union fortification manned by a mixture of Union Cavalry and black infantry. Quantrill attacked.

Despite initial Rebel success. all the Union surviving troops got inside the post at Baxter Springs, and secured the entrance. It was from that point that the guerrillas began to take losses. It was at that point that they saw a Union wagon train approaching. The train was the command headquarters and escort for Union General James Blunt.

Quantrill and his men attacked, helped in part by the slowness of the escort's response, because they thought the guerrillas were Union troops [the bushwhackers wore at least pieces of Union uniforms most of the time]. Although blunt survived the attack [he made it to Baxter Springs], he lost 70% of his men. And many of the dead had been scalped, a trademark of Bloody Bill Anderson.

Baxter Springs was Quantrill's acme. The Texans, having heard about Lawrence were NOT pleased to see him. While in Texas, he lost control of his men, who began preying on Southerners. Ordered by Confederate authorities to arrest Anderson, Quantrill failed in his mission, with Anderson and his men riding away. Shortly after that, his lieutenant, George Todd, supplanted Quantrill as head of his own band. In the Spring of 1864, Quantrill rode north with only six followers. He would make rare appearances in 1864, and would flee Missouri and die in Kentucky in 1865.

 28 
 on: October 05, 2018, 01:28:51 pm 
Started by PzLdr - Last post by apples
Best ever!

 29 
 on: October 05, 2018, 01:28:20 pm 
Started by PzLdr - Last post by apples
Love this kind of history!  Wink That and gangsters.

 30 
 on: October 05, 2018, 12:40:26 am 
Started by PzLdr - Last post by PzLdr
Lewis and Clark reported them as friendly to the Americans. They were the only Indian tribe to breed a new type of horse [the Appaloosa] They lived in peace with their neighbors, traveling from their home in the Wallowa valley east through Idaho to hunt bison with the Crow, and back again. They were called Nez Perce [although they didn't pierce their noses], and in 1877, they proved how formidable as warriors they were when they led the Army on a dance that covered almost 1,000 miles when it was done.

It started, as it usually did, over the U.S. government trying to move the Nez Perce off lands they held by treaty, very desirable lands. The Nez Perce hunted and gathered. but they also raised cattle, quite successfully. And one of the reasons they were able to do that was their land. But white settlers wanted it, and no matter how hard Joseph and his brother Ollikut tried to reason with the whites, it never worked. Finally, the inevitable happened. some young Nez Perce rode out and killed some whites. The Army came in, and in a series of battles, such as White Bird Creek, the Nez Perce, fighting from field fortifications stopped the Army cold.

MG O.O. Howard [of Reconstruction,Howard University and Cochise's surrender fame] led the Army in a pursuit across the Bitteroot Mountains and the Lolo Pass toward Montana.

The trek was not Joseph's idea, but Looking Glass' [a war chief like Ollikut]. Looking Glass, who had spent many seasons hunting with the Crow [and fighting the Crows' traditional enemies, the Sioux and Cheyenne], believed the Crow would shelter the Nez Perce and help them fight the U.S. Army [he was disappointed in both those beliefs]. The Crow turned them away.

The next plan was to flee to Canada, where Sitting Bull had fled earlier that year. But near exhaustion, while still ahead of Howard, the Indians paused to rest. It was their undoing, because Nelson Miles was closing on them from the east.

The first the Nez Perce knew of this new turn of events, was when the Army opened fire. Both Ollikut and Looking Glass were killed. When Howard came up to complete the encirclement, it was all over [although White bird and some of his band managed to sneak through the Army lines and reached Canada.

It was the next day that Joseph proclaimed he would make war no more, forever. The Nez Perce were taken back over their escape route, but were confined to a reservation away from the Wallowa Valley. Joseph made several visits to the white House to get Presidential approval for a return to his homeland. He died a failure in those efforts.

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